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Pineapple Guava Select Seedlings 1
Pineapple Guava Select Seedling 2Pineapple Guava Select SeedGuava Pineapple Flower (2)

SELECT SEEDLINGS PINEAPPLE GUAVA 

$29.99

Planting and Care Facts (pdf)Zone: 8A-10A

Pineapple Guava Size Info

Size: 5x5x12″ or 3 Gal., 1-2 Ft.

213 in stock

SKU: 1290 Categories: ,

Product Description

Select Seedling Pineapple Guava- Great Edible Hedge!

These Pineapple Guava Seedlings come from fruit collected from our mother hedge at the farm, These plants are chosen for their superior flavor and large size. All are open pollinated seedlings. They are a mix of Mammoth, Trask, Nezbeth and select seedlings we’ve collected through the years. Be sure to get two or three plants to ensure good pollination. Hardy to 15F pineapple guava can fruit with as little as 50 chill hours. Fruit ripens September through October. Zones 8A-10A.

Note: We’re so sorry… but due to agricultural restrictions we cannot ship any plants to international countries, or the states of California, Hawaii and Alaska. Also, no citrus trees can be shipped outside of the state of Florida.

Additional Information

Pot Size

5x5x12 or 3 Gal.

Plant Height

1 to 2 foot Multi-trunk Bush

Planting Zone

8A-10A

Pollinator

Pollinate with a different variety or a seedling

Ripening Season

Late August through October

Choosing the Right Pineapple Guava Variety…

Pineapple guava Acca sellowiana  Pineapple Guava Select Seedlings 2is a fruit that originated from Brazil. Although not a true guava, it’s fruit so closely resembles guava it is a wonderful substitute.  Some varieties of this cold-hardy fruit can be grown as far north as zone 7b. The trees are evergreen, with striking blue- green leaves that are silvery white underneath. Plants bloom in May and are covered with small orchid-like pink and crimson blooms. The fleshy pink petals are a delicious treat and have a sweet flavor and texture that melts in your mouth like cotton candy. By September  the plum-shaped fruit are ready to eat and are harvested when they fall to the ground. Simply slice open and scoop out the delectable creamy white flesh. The flavor is considered to be the best in the world by many true guava lovers! Use fresh in fruit salad or make guava jelly and jam.
Pineapple guavas are one of the easiest, most problem free fruits you can grow – a little care will go a long way with this tree. Pineapple guavas need cross-pollination – be sure to get at least 2 plants. 

 

POLLINATION

Guava Pineapple FlowerPineapple Guava varieties are either self fertile or require cross-pollination to set fruit. Cross pollination is required for seedlings, so be sure to plant at least two. Plants need to be within 10 foot for good cross pollination and no further than 15 foot apart.

 

 

 

 

 

LANDSCAPING WITH PINEAPPLE GUAVA Open Me)

Landscaping with Pineapple Guavas…..

Pineapple Guava Select Seedlings 1Pineapple guavas grow to approximately 18 feet tall. When lightly pruned, they develop into graceful small trees. They can also be trimmed into bold, short hedges or tall thick privacy screens. The misty blue-green foliage blends well with the tropical broad leaves of the Loquat and Citrus trees for a truly edible tapestry hedge.

 

 

 

 

 

LEARN WHERE AND HOW TO PLANT YOUR PINEAPPLE GUAVAS (Open Me)

SITE SELECTION AND CORRECT SPACING FOR PINEAPPLE GUAVAS

Well-drained sandy soils are preferred, but pineapple guavas will grow on many soil types if good drainage is provided. Trees will grow more vigorously and produce more fruit in full sun.

SPACING For privacy hedges, plant on 4-6 foot centers, With good care plants spaced 4 foot apart will grow together in a short time on 6 foot it will take longer. To create a small tree form space, trees should be at least 8-10 feet apart, but no further than 15 feet apart, to ensure cross pollination.

GETTING THE SOIL RIGHT AND PLANTING PINEAPPLE GUAVAS

Planting a TreePineapple guavas prefer slightly acid soil (pH 5.5-6.5), but soils of up to moderate alkalinity are readily tolerated. If you are in doubt about the acidity of your soil, take a sample to your  Cooperative Extension Agent in your county for a soil test. Dig a planting hole approximately three times the width of the pot and at the same depth as the root ball. Set that soil aside and mix it 50/50 with either aged mushroom compost, aged manure, or rotted pine bark & aged manure/compost. Remove the plant from the pot, gently loosen the root ball and place in the planting hole. To avoid burying too deep, make sure plant is positioned with the top most roots at the soil line. Fill the planting hole with the mix of soil and organic matter; gently tamp it in. Water thoroughly to settle the roots and eliminate air pockets. Do NOT put fertilizer in the planting hole. Only apply fertilizer if it is the correct time of year (see Fertilization section below). If desired, construct a water basin around the base of the tree approximately 36 inches in diameter.

MULCHING  If desired, construct a water basin around the base of the tree approximately 36 inches in diameter. Keep an area approximately 4 feet in diameter around the apple clear of grass and weeds to minimize competition for water and nutrients. Mulch in spring and summer with approximately 4-6 inches of mulch. Pull mulch a couple of inches away from the trunk for good air circulation. In spring, we suggest a mix of compost and weed-free hay as mulch. In summer, use weed-free hay or grass clippings alone. Pine bark and pine needles are also good mulches.

LEARN HOW TO FERTILIZE AND WATER YOUR PINEAPPLE GUAVAS (Open Me)

FERTILIZING PINEAPPLE GUAVAS

The type of fertilizer you choose may be chemical or organic. Make sure that the fertilizer contains iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium, molybdenum, copper and boron. These minor elements are very important to plants and most soils are low in these elements. Application rates vary according to age of plant.

See chart below.

FERTILIZING PINEAPPLE GUAVAS
10-10-10 or 10-0-10 with minerals

1 cup per each year of trees life

-Max out at 9 cups on Mature Trees

Espoma Citrus Tone

(Organic)

 

6 cups for 1 year old

10 cups for 2 year old (4-6ft)

18 cups for 7-9ft tree

24 cups for tree over 9ft

Spread the fertilizer evenly under the entire canopy of the plant avoiding a 5-inch area around the trunk. Water or rake in. For Zones 9-10, fertilize 3 times each year in late February, late May and late July/early August. For plants further north (Zones 7-8b), fertilize in March or after bud break. Never fertilize after August (June in Zones 7-8b) as this will promote new growth late in the year which will be subject to freeze damage.

WATERING PINEAPPLE GUAVAS

The first year is the critical time for the establishment of a new pineapple guavas. Water thoroughly twice a week on light soils and once a week on clay soils. Soak the entire root system deeply – this usually takes 40-50 minutes. Pineapple Guavas should receive at least 1 inch of water each week for best growth and fruit production. Water regularly, especially during dry periods. Fruit may drop prematurely if insufficiently irrigated during dry spells.

LEARN HOW TO PRUNE YOUR PINEAPPLE GUAVAS (Open Me)

PRUNING AND CARE OF PINEAPPLE GUAVAS

Pineapple guavas require little pruning. Remove dead and damaged wood when appropriate. Prune as desired if using them in a hedge or privacy screen. Pineapple guavas are essentially free from pests and diseases.

LEARN HOW TO CONTROL INSECTS AND DISEASE ON YOUR PINEAPPLE GUAVAS (Open Me)

Pineapple guavas are essentially free from pests and diseases, in all the years we have grown them, we have never needed to spray them. Always remember that good disease resistance begins with the health of the plant. Plants stressed from lack of water, not enough sun or being under fed are more susceptible to disease and insects.  Maintaining good sanitation practices in the orchard is most important. The removal of diseased and dead wood, and picking up fallen or rotting fruit off the trees as it occurs, will go a long way in keeping disease and insects at a minimum. Spray at first sign of an issue, rather than waiting until the problem is out of hand will go a long way to keeping your plants healthy and fruiting properly.