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Rosbourgh Blackberry Fruit

ROSBOROUGH BLACKBERRY PLANT

$11.99

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Product Description

Rosbrough – Hedging Blackberry!

A Texas variety, Rosborough is a thorny upright grower with plenty of fruit production. Good-sized fruit are said to be “slightly acid”. Rosborough has been shown to be well-adapted to the coastal plain, according to the Clemson University Extension Office Home & Garden Information Center. Ripens late May. Zones 8B-9.

Note: We’re so sorry… but due to agricultural restrictions we cannot ship any plants to international countries, or the states of California, Hawaii and Alaska. Also, no citrus trees can be shipped outside of the state of Florida.

Additional Information

Planting Zone

8B-9

Chill Hours

300-400

Pollinator

Self-fertile

Ripening Season

Late May

Plant Height

1-2 Ft.

Pot Size

1 Gal

Choosing the Right Berry Variety…

Natchez BlackberrySummer and berries—searching the roadside for patches of tasty wild berries for jams and fresh eating. Every country family has done it, and the wild patches are quickly disappearing to urban sprawl. So why not grow your own? Homegrown blackberries are well worth the effort, and can be grown by any gardener. Smaller growers than fruit trees, they fit easily into the tightest of yards, and can be easily tucked into your landscape or just added to the vegetable garden.  Many new cultivars make it easy to have that same wild flavor in a patch in your backyard (and some varieties are thorn-less). Most of the varieties you’ll buy from us, are bred for their size, production, and excellent fresh flavor. We choose to offer plants that do especially well in the hot humid south. In the edible landscape they make great hedges and as backdrops for the flower border. Even a city gardener can have a few berry plants by planting them in pots!

POLLINATION

Blackberries, boysenberries, and raspberries (Yes, we have a raspberry for the South) are all self-pollinating, so plant one or plant 100!

 

LANDSCAPING WITH BERRY PLANTS Open Me)

Landscaping with Berry Plants…..

Elderberry FlowersBrambles can be upright hedge varieties or trailing varieties that require a trellis. Use a row of hedging blackberries to define your garden’s edge. Add a boysenberry or raspberry trellis beside a path and have a berry on the way down the driveway. The hedging growth of elderberry bushes can add a graceful screen to your property or when planted as a single specimen develops into a graceful 10 foot shrub with arching canes, beautiful in flower as well as when fruiting. Regardless of which berry you choose, don’t forget to plant a few extra plants for all the wildlife they’ll attract!

LEARN WHERE AND HOW TO PLANT YOUR BERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

SITE SELECTION AND CORRECT SPACING FOR BERRY PLANTS

Well-drained, sandy, rich soils are preferred. Raspberries, Boysenberries and Blackberries do not tolerate flooding and may grow poorly in mucky soils unless planted in raised mounds. Elderberries on the other hand love wetlands. All berry plants will grow more vigorously and produce more fruit in full sun.

SPACING For trailing varieties that need a trellis set your plants 10 feet apart in rows at least 15 foot apart. It is best to place your plants 5 feet from pressure treated posts. For hedge row plantings of Elderberry, plant at least 5 feet apart so they will have room to spread and plant rows at least 15 foot apart. For specimen plants set plants 1o to 15 foot apart. Upright blackberries and raspberries are planted 2 to 3 feet apart in the row with 15 feet between rows

GETTING THE SOIL RIGHT AND PLANTING BERRY PLANTS

Berry Planting

 

  Brambles prefer slightly acid soil (pH 6.0-6.5), but soils of moderate alkalinity are tolerated. Elderberries aren’t picky about soil types and will thrive in acid or alkaline soils. If you are in doubt about the acidity of your soil, take a soil sample to the Cooperative Extension Agent in your county for a soil test.Enrich the bed with 1 to 3 inches of aged manure or mushroom compost. Before planting make sure the plants are well watered and the soil in your planting hole is not excessively dry. Remove the plant from the pot and place in the planting hole. To avoid burying too deep, make sure plant is positioned with the top most roots at the soil line. If plants have a tightly packed root system gently work the root ball loose. Water thoroughly to settle the roots and eliminate air pockets. Do NOT put fertilize in the planting hole. Only apply fertilizer if it is the correct time of year (see Fertilization section below).

MULCHING Beds may be mulched with organic mulches like hay, oat straw, bark and leaves. Mulching is beneficial in controlling competitive weeds as well as building the organic matter in the root zone. A well mulched bed will encourage good root sucker formation and a healthy full row of canes sooner.

 

LEARN HOW TO BUILD A TRELLIS FOR YOUR BERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

Berry TellisTRELLISES FOR TRAILING BLACKBERRY AND BOYSENBERRY To construct a simple 3 Wire Horizontal trellis for trailing blackberry and boysenberry use two 7-8 feet upright posts sunk 2 feet in the ground leaving 5-6 feet above ground. Anchor end posts. Attach three 9-gauge wires at 18-inch intervals beginning 24 inches from the ground. Place posts no more than 20 feet apart for best stability (diagram has posts at 10 ft.).

 

Raspberry TrellisRASPBERRY TRELLISES, you’ll need to build a T bar catch rail system. Set a row of post 10 feet apart in the middle of the hedge row.  Post should be 4″x4″x8 foot in length and set two foot in the ground, bringing the top to an overall height of 5 foot. Attach one 2″x4″x18″  at 24″ off grade. Attach the second 2″x4″x24″  at the top of the post. String 2 sets of wire (9 gauge) on top of ends of tee bars to form the catch rail system.Use an achorage system on the end posts. See diagram..

LEARN HOW TO FERTILIZE AND WATER YOUR BERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

FERTILIZING BERRY PLANTS

The type of fertilizer you choose may be chemical or organic. Make sure that the fertilizer contains iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium, molybdenum, copper and boron. These minor elements are very important to plants and most soils are low in these elements. Application rates vary according to age of plant.

HEDGE ROW PLANTINGS of Blackberry, Boysenberry, Elderberry and Raspberry plants the amount of fertilizer applied increases each year until the 4th year after planting. In hedge row plantings by the 3rd year the plants should have grown together, so apply your fertilizer for every four foot of row, spreading the fertilizer in a four foot wide band down the row.

 For Zones 9-10, fertilize 3 times each year in late February, late May and late July/early August. For plants further north (Zones 7-8b), fertilize in March or after bud break. Never fertilize after August (June in Zones 7-8b) as this will promote new growth late in the year which will be subject to freeze damage.Water or rake in fertilizer. 

See chart below.

FERTILIZING HEDGE ROW PLANTS
10-10-10 or 10-0-10 with minerals

YEAR 1

Sprinkle 2/3 cup in a 24-inch circle around each plant in late February.

In late May and late July, sprinkle 2/3 cup in a 30-inch circle around each plant.

 

YEAR 2

Sprinkle 1 cup in a 36-inch circle around each plant in late February, late May and late July

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 3

Sprinkle 2 cups of fertilizer in a 4 ft circle around each plant in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

YEAR 4 AND SO ON

Sprinkle 3 cups for every 4ft of row. Spread fertilizer in a 4ft wide band down the row.

 

 

 

 

Espoma Citrus Tone

(Organic)

 

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 1

Sprinkle 1 ½ cups of Citrus Tone in a 24-inch circle around each plant in late February.

In late May and late July, sprinkle

1 ½ cups of Citrus Tone in a 30-inch circle around each plant.

YEAR 2

Sprinkle 2 ½ cups of Citrus Tone in a 36-inch circle around each plant in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 3

Sprinkle 4 cups of Citrus Tone around each plant in a 4 ft circle in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 4 AND SO ON

Sprinkle 6 cups for every 4ft of row. Spread fertilizer in a 4ft wide band down the row.

 

 

 

 

 

SPECIMEN ELDERBERRIES use 1 cup of 10-10-10 or 10-0-10 for each year of a elderberry’s age in late February, late May and late July/early August (i.e. 1 cup per application for a one year-old elderberry, 2 cups for a two year-old). Continue increasing fertilizer yearly until application rate reaches 4 cups. If using Citrus Tone, use 2 cups for each year of elderberry’s age. Increase each year, until you reach 8 cups.

 

Spread the fertilizer evenly under the entire canopy of the plant avoiding a 5-inch area around the trunk. Water or rake in. For Zones 9-10, fertilize 3 times each year in late February, late May and late July/early August. For plants further north (Zones 7-8b), fertilize in March or after bud break. Never fertilize after August (June in Zones 7-8b) as this will promote new growth late in the year which will be subject to freeze damage.

WATERING BERRY PLANTS

The first year is the critical time for the establishment of a new fig. Water thoroughly
twice a week on light soils and once a week on clay soils. Soak the entire root system deeply – this
usually takes 40-50 minutes. Berry plants should receive at least 1 inch of water each week for best growth
and fruit production. Water regularly, especially during dry periods. Fruit may drop
prematurely if insufficiently irrigated during dry spells.

LEARN HOW TO TRAIN AND PRUNE YOUR BERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

TRAINING AND PRUNING BERRY PLANTS

TRELLISED VARIETIES: Fruit is produced on 2 year-old canes, which die after fruiting. New canes that sprout in the spring will fruit the following year. In the first year after planting, the canes you planted will fruit. Thread the original canes you planted through the wires for the fruiting season. Allow the current year’s new canes to run along the ground. After fruiting, cut and remove the canes that have fruited. Thread the new canes through the trellis. Spread canes evenly through the trellis and thread carefully to avoid breakage and support the canes.

ERECT BLACKBERRY AND RASPBERRY: Fruit is produced on 2 year-old canes, which die after fruiting. New canes that sprout in the spring will fruit the following year. In the first year after planting, the canes you planted will fruit and should be removed after they die. The new canes produced from the original canes you planted in spring, should be topped to about 40 inches in early summer to encourage lateral branching, and then allowed to grow until the winter dormant season. In each succeeding year, remove the current year’s fruiting canes after they produce fruit.

ELDERBERRY: Fruits each year and like blueberries extend themselves through suckers that come up from the roots. In time elderberries can become a thick hedge and will require clearing out of old and dead branches/stems. 

LEARN HOW TO CONTROL INSECTS AND DISEASE ON YOUR BERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

Insects and disease on cane berries are rarely a problem. Buying disease free plants is the sure way to avoid trouble. After harvest, trim dying canes that bore fruit, gather and burn or haul off thetrimmings to stop any future problems. Most berry patches have a life span of about 7 years, at this point it is best to start a new row else where. Gather your healthiest suckers from you existing patch or buy disease free stock and rebuild a new row with manure and good mulch to plant them in. It’s this rotation of planting area that will help you avoid the worse of the berry diseases. 

Always remember that good disease resistance begins with the health of the plant. Plants stressed from lack of water, not enough sun or being under fed are more susceptible to disease and insects.  Maintaining good sanitation practices in the orchard is most important. The removal of diseased and dead wood, and picking up fallen or rotting fruit off the trees as it occurs, will go a long way in keeping disease and insects at a minimum. Spray at first sign of an issue, rather than waiting until the problem is out of hand will go a long way to keeping your plants healthy and fruiting properly.