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Pink Lemonade Blueberry Fruit
Blueberry Bloom

PINK LEMONADE BLUEBERRY PLANT

$14.99$29.99

Planting and Care Facts (pdf)Zone: 9A-9B Blueberry Size Info

Size: 1 Gal., 1-2 Ft.

Size: 3 Gal., 2-3 Ft.

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Product Description

Pink Lemonade – Rabbit eye Blueberry

Who would have thought PINK Blueberry Plants Plants!! Pink Lemonade produces bright pink fruit that is gorgeous against its glossy green foliage. This new hybrid of rabbit eye and high bush blueberry plants will delight the eyes and the palate. If you’re looking for more than just another shrub in your yard, try Pink Lemonade. This USDA release has a wide range of adaptability. It will fruit well from New Jersey to central Florida. Small grower good for pots and small spaces, mature height 5-6ft. Ripens in July. 200 to 900 chill hours. Needs another rabbit eye for pollination.

Note: We’re so sorry… but due to agricultural restrictions, we cannot ship any plants to international countries, or the states of California, Hawaii, and Alaska. Also, no citrus trees can be shipped outside of the state of Florida.

Additional Information

Pot Size

1 Gal, 3 Gal

Plant Height

1-2 Ft., 2-3 Ft.

Planting Zone

7-9B

Chill Hours

900-200

Pollinator

Pollinate with another rabbiteye variety

Ripening Season

July

Choosing the Right Blueberry Variety…

Ochlockonee Blueberry Fruit Native throughout most of the eastern United States, blueberries are one of the easiest and most rewarding fruits the homeowner can grow. The bushes require a little effort to establish, but once rooted are very disease and drought resistant; most fruit their second year. Thanks to recent breeding programs at the Universities of Florida and Georgia, we now have a wide range of varieties to choose from, making it possible to have delicious blueberries from early May to late July! We attend many blueberry seminars throughout the year so we are always up on the latest and most practical techniques to help you with site evaluation, soil preparation, correct planting procedures and maintenance of your blueberry patch.

POLLINATION

Blueberries require cross pollination. Thus we always have to plant at least two varieties to ensure good fruit set. Two groups of blueberries are available.

 

-Rabbiteye blueberries were developed from native rabbiteye blueberries. They grow as shrubs and will reach 6-20 feet. Their ripening season is from May to July.

 

Blueberry Flowers-Tetraploid (Southern Highbush) blueberries are a new development – a cross between Rabbiteye and Northern Highbush blueberries. Everything is different about them. They are smaller, slower-growing and have thicker, more crinkly leaves. Most important, they extend the blueberry season by ripening heavy crops at the very start of the blueberry season. Tetraploids require some extra fruit thinning to achieve a balance between plant size and healthy fruit production. Each group requires a pollinator from within the group—you must plant at least two varieties of rabbiteye or two varieties of tetraploid. A brief list of varieties is at the end of this handout.

 

LANDSCAPING WITH BLUEBERRY PLANTS Open Me)

Landscaping with Blueberry Plants…..

Blueberry FlowersAnywhere you want a hedge, think of blueberries first. These durable, low-maintenance shrubs have a unique misty blue cast and are truly beautiful in all seasons. In spring, dainty, bell-like white blooms cover reddish canes. Flowers are followed by blue-tinged foliage and huge clusters of powder blue fruit. In autumn they make a brilliant show as they turn from orange to scarlet to fiery red.

Sunshine Blueberry FruitIf you want a short thick hedge, tetraploids grow more slowly and can be sheared. Most of the tetraploids will mature to around 6 to 8 foot in height. If you want a very low 3 to 4 foot hedge plant Sunshine Blue. Rabbiteye varieties make a nice tall thick hedge anywhere from 6-20 feet high. Use blueberries to line a driveway or walkway or as backdrop hedges. In the garden, line a fence with blueberries for luscious fruit that doesn’t take much space and is always lovely. Choose varieties with different ripening times to spread the fruiting season. Blueberries can also be trained into fountain-shaped shrubs or small trees. Some varieties do well as container plants for a patio gardener.

 

LEARN WHERE AND HOW TO PLANT YOUR BLUEBERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

SITE SELECTION AND CORRECT SPACING FOR BLUEBERRY PLANTS

Well-drained sandy loam soils are preferred, but blueberries will grow on many soil types if good drainage is provided. Blueberries will grow more vigorously and produce more fruit in full sun. Avoid frost pockets – late season frosts can damage fruit production in early-flowering varieties.

SPACING

 Spacing for blueberries depends upon the desired use in the landscape. Bushes can be planted individually or in a hedgerow. If planting a hedgerow, space 5-6 feet apart with rows 10-12 feet apart. If planting bushes individually, place plants for cross pollination no more than 10 feet apart. Remove all flowers the first year to encourage more growth.

 

GETTING THE SOIL RIGHT AND PLANTING BLUEBERRY PLANTS

Berry PlantingBlueberries require acid soil (pH 4.5-5.5). If you are in doubt about the acidity of your soil, take a soil sample to the Cooperative Extension Agent in your county for a soil test. Blueberries will not grow well in soils with a pH above 5.5. Adjust soil acidity as necessary with powdered sulfur and iron sulfate. Do NOT use aluminum sulfate, as this material is toxic to blueberries. For individual plants, sulfur a 6 x 6 foot area around the plant. Hedgerows need to be sulfured in a 3 foot wide band down the row.

Blueberries are spreaders by nature, they send out root suckers and will over time in a hedge row setting grow together. This is good for the plant as new sucker formation keeps the plants healthy. In order to encourage the spread of the plant roto-till  acidic organic matter like ground rotted pine bark or oak leaves into the a 3-4 foot wide band down the row. When planting dig a hole approximately three times the width of the pot and at the same depth as the root ball. Enrich the planting hole with peat moss mixed with soil dug from the hole (50/50 mix). Do NOT use mushroom compost or manure in the planting hole or as mulch. You can make your plants sick and even kill them with manure or mushroom compost.

Remove the blueberry bush from the pot, gently loosen the root ball and place in the planting hole. To avoid burying too deep, make sure the plant is positioned with the top most roots at the soil line. Fill the planting hole with the mix of soil and peat moss; gently tamp it in. Water thoroughly to settle the roots and eliminate air pockets. Do NOT put fertilize in the planting hole. Only apply fertilizer if it is the correct time of year (see Fertilization section below).

 

MULCHING

Blueberry Mulch Beds IFASIf desired, construct a water basin around the base of the bush approximately 36 inches in diameter. Blueberries are very shallowly rooted and a good mulch insures the plants root stay moist in dry spells. It also cuts down on weed competition. Mulch in spring and fall with approximately 4-6 inches of acid mulch (pine bark, oak leaves).If trying to create a hedge row planting,mulch a 3-4 foot wide area down the row.  Pull mulch a couple of inches away from the trunk for good air circulation. Do NOT mulch with mushroom compost.

LEARN HOW TO FERTILIZE AND WATER YOUR BLUEBERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

FERTILIZING BLUEBERRY PLANTS

The type of fertilizer you choose may be chemical or organic. Make sure that the fertilizer
contains iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium, molybdenum, copper and boron. These minor elements
are very important to plants and most soils are low in these elements. Application rates vary
according to age of plant.

See chart below.

FERTILIZING HEDGE ROW PLANTS
10-8-8

(with minerals)

for Azalea/Camellias

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 1

1/2 cup per plant in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 2

1 cup per plant in late February, late May and late July.

YEAR 3

2 cups per plant in late February, late May and late July.

.

 

 

 

 

YEAR 4 AND SO ON

4 cups for every 4ft of row. Spread fertilizer in a 4ft wide band down the row in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Espoma

Holly Tone

(Organic)

 

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 1

1 ½ cup per plant in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 2

2 ½ cups per plant in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 3

4 cups per plant in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 4 AND SO ON

6-10 cups for every 4ft of row. Spread fertilizer in a 4ft wide band down the row in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be careful to spread the fertilizer evenly over the blueberry’s root zone and water it in well. Blueberries form suckers and the plant expands each year, the amount of fertilizer applied increases each year until the 4th year after planting.

In Zones 8-9 fertilize 3 times each year in late February, late May and late July/early August. Never fertilize after August as this will promote new growth late in the year which will be subject to freeze damage.

If your young blueberry plants aren’t growing, they may be stalled. In that event, supplement your fertilizer with a liquid fertilizer for Azalea/Camellias (like Miracid). Treat them once a week for a month. If they still haven’t grown 6 inches, continue the treatment. Blueberries need to double in size the first year in the ground or they will be stunted.

WATERING BLUEBERRY PLANTS

The first year is a critical time for the establishment of a new blueberry bush. Water thoroughly twice a week on light soils and once a week on clay soils. Soak the entire root system deeply – this usually takes 45-60 minutes. Established bushes should receive at least 1 inch of water each week. Because blueberries are very shallowly rooted, we strongly recommend that irrigation be installed when you plant your blueberries. Microsprinkler irrigation works best, because water is spread over the root zone. Soaker hoses can be used in a pinch. Water regularly, especially during dry periods. Keep an area approximately 4 feet in diameter around the bush clear of grass and weeds to minimize competition for water and nutrients. Mulch this area with pine bark or leaves.

LEARN HOW TO PRUNE YOUR BLUEBERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

PRUNING BLUEBERRY PLANTS

Routine pruning of blueberries is unnecessary until plants are 3 years old. During this time, remove dead, damaged or diseased limbs. Cut any leggy growth so the plant will bush up. Make all cuts flush with the limb or the next largest branch. Do not leave stubs. For established rabbiteye blueberries, approximately one quarter of the oldest canes are pruned each year to encourage cane renewal. Three to four year-old canes have maximum fruit production, declining with age. Blueberries can be lightly topped right after fruit harvest to hold down the height of the plant. All heavy thinning cuts should be made in the dormant season.

 

LEARN HOW TO CONTROL INSECTS AND DISEASE ON YOUR BLUEBERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

Blueberries have few disease or insect problems. Occasionally caterpillars can be a problem and may be controlled with products containing Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis).

Always remember that good disease resistance begins with the health of the plant. Plants stressed from lack of water, not enough sun or being under fed are more susceptible to disease and insects.  Maintaining good sanitation practices in the berry patch is most important. The removal of diseased and dead wood, and picking up fallen or rotting fruit off the bushes as it occurs, will go a long way in keeping disease and insects at a minimum. Spray at first sign of an issue, rather than waiting until the problem is out of hand will go a long way to keeping your plants healthy and fruiting properly.