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Orange Quince
Quince Preserves 7Fruiting Quince

ORANGE QUINCE

$39.99

Planting and Care Facts (pdf)Zone: 5-9 Quince Size Info

Size: 5x5x12″ or 3 Gal., 4-5 Ft.

13 in stock

Product Description

Note: We’re so sorry… but due to agricultural restrictions we cannot ship any plants to international countries, or the states of California, Hawaii and Alaska. Also, no citrus trees can be shipped outside of the state of Florida.

Orange Quince – Excellent preserves!

Orange quince gets it’s name for the lovely orange over tones it has in it’s flavor. Medium size round apple shaped fruit are round with a golden-colored skin and yellow flesh. Excellent cooked in sauces, butters, marmalades or preserves. Beautiful small self-fertile tree with pale pink blossoms in spring, good edible landscape trees. Very productive and disease resistant. Fruit ripens September through October. Zones 5-9.

 

Additional Information

Pot Size

5x5x12 or 3 Gal.

Plant Height

4-5 Ft.

Planting Zone

5-9

Pollinator

Self-fertile

 

Choosing the Right Quince Variety…

 

Aromytha Fruiting Quince

Aromytha Fruiting Quince

Quince are one of those old time fruits, rarely seen in the markets of today’s world. Having lost popularity due to no fault of their own, it’s hard to believe that they occupied such an important place in the kitchens and gardens of almost every rural home at the beginning of the 20th century.  Quince fruit has a high pectin content and  is prized for jelly. The ripe fruit are used for traditional Christmas dinner sauces and added to spicy meat dishes, We’re pleased to offer some great fruiting varieties and have also included a couple of wonderful flowering quinces. These will bring joy to the dull winter garden and are often the sign of an upcoming spring. Fill your winter flower vases and enjoy your quince sauces on the long days of winter.  

 

 

POLLINATION

Quince are self-fertile and do not require a pollinator.

 

Landscaping with Quince…..

Cameo Flowering Quince

Cameo Flowering Quince

 

Uniquely gnarled and twisted in form, the quince makes an unusual tree to add to the shrubbery border. Delicate, large pale-pink blooms resemble apple blossoms and are sweetly fragrant, as is the ripe fruit. If grafted trees grow as a single trunk. Un-grafted trees may be allowed to sucker and planted closely together, growing a fabulous hedge. Flowering quince makes a colorful show through out late winter and early spring. They are extremely colorful, blooming with out foliage in a wide range of pinks, reds and whites. Beautiful when inter-planted with spring-flowering bulbs.

 

 

 

LEARN WHERE AND HOW TO PLANT YOUR QUINCE TREES (Open Me)

SITE SELECTION AND CORRECT SPACING FOR QUINCE TREES

Quinces produce best on deep, heavy loam, but they will grow on many soil types. Trees will grow more vigorously and produce more fruit in full sun. Mature height on fruit quince range from 15 to 20 foot space they trees 15 to 20 foot apart. Flowering quince are short shrubs growing 4 to 8 feet in height, spacing can be as close as 4 foot for hedges or 6 to 8 foot if you’d like to see individuality between the plants.

 

GETTING THE SOIL RIGHT AND PLANTING QUINCE TREES

Planting a TreeQuinces prefer slightly alkaline soil (pH 6.5 to 7.0 or higher). If you are in doubt about the pH of your soil, take a soil sample to the Cooperative Extension Agent in your county for a soil test. Adjust soil pH as necessary. A soil pH of 7.0 or higher releases extra calcium, preventing bitter rot on ripening fruits. Dig a planting hole approximately three times the width of the pot and at the same depth as the root ball. Set that soil aside and mix it 50/50 with either aged mushroom compost, aged manure, or rotted pine bark & aged manure/compost. Remove the plant from the pot, gently loosen the root ball and place in the planting hole. To avoid burying too deep, make sure plant is positioned with the top most
roots at the soil line. Fill the planting hole with the mix of soil and organic matter; gently tamp it in. Water thoroughly to settle the roots and eliminate air pockets. Do NOT put fertilizer in the planting hole. Only apply fertilizer if it is the correct time of year (see Fertilization section below). If desired, construct a water basin around the base of the tree approximately 36 inches in diameter.

MULCHING… Mulch in spring and summer with approximately 4-6 inches of mulch. To build a healthy soil stucture use a fast breaking down mulch like hay or straw. Pull mulch a couple of inches away from the trunk for good air circulation.

LEARN HOW TO FERTILIZE AND WATER YOUR QUINCE TREES (Open Me)

FERTILIZING QUINCE TREES

The type of fertilizer you choose may be chemical or organic. Make sure that the fertilizer contains iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium, molybdenum, copper and boron. These minor elements are very important to plants and most soils are low in these elements. Application rates vary according to age of plant.

See chart below.

FERTILIZING QUINCE TREES
10-10-10 or 10-0-10 with minerals

1 cup per each year of trees life

-Max out at 9 cups on Mature Trees

Espoma Citrus Tone

(Organic)

 

6 cups for 1 year old

10 cups for 2 year old (4-6ft)

18 cups for 7-9ft tree

24 cups for tree over 9ft

Spread the fertilizer evenly under the entire canopy of the plant avoiding a 5-inch area around the trunk. Water or rake in. For Zones 9-10, fertilize 3 times each year in late February, late May and late July/early August. For plants further north (Zones 7-8b), fertilize in March or after bud break. Never fertilize after August (June in Zones 7-8b) as this will promote new growth late in the year which will be subject to freeze damage.

Over-fertilization with nitrogen may contribute to fruit drop and promote fire blight. If fruit drop occurs, switch to a bloom special-type of low nitrogen fertilizer.

WATERING QUINCE TREES

The first year is the critical time for the establishment of a new quince. Water thoroughly twice a week on light soils and once a week on clay soils. Soak the entire root system deeply – this usually takes 40-50 minutes. Quince should receive at least 1 inch of water each week for best growth and fruit production. Water regularly, especially during dry periods. Fruit may drop prematurely if insufficiently irrigated during dry spells.

LEARN HOW TO HARVEST YOUR QUINCE (Open Me)

HARVESTING FRUIT ON QUINCE TREES

Quince Preserves 7

Making Quince Preserves

Quinces are ripened like pears off the tree. Ripe fruit are highly fragrant. Quince is not a fruit that you eat off the tree, it must be cooked. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LEARN HOW TO CONTROL INSECTS AND DISEASE ON YOUR QUINCE TREES (Open Me)

Fire Blight

Fire Blight

Quince are usually a trouble free tree and a good choice for organic gardeners. Aphids maybe an occasional  problem and are easily controlled with Neem.  Fire Blight can be a problem if present elsewhere in the orchard. Fire Blight is controlled by cutting out and destroying limbs that show evidence of the disease throughout the year. Be sure to cut 8 inches below visible damage and sterilize your pruning shears between cuts to avoid cross contamination.

 

Always remember that good disease resistance begins with the health of the plant. Plants stressed from lack of water, not enough sun or being under fed are more susceptible to disease and insects.  Maintaining good sanitation practices in the orchard is most important. The removal of diseased and dead wood, and picking up fallen or rotting fruit off the trees as it occurs, will go a long way in keeping disease and insects at a minimum. Spray at first sign of an issue, rather than waiting until the problem is out of hand will go a long way to keeping your plants healthy and fruiting properly.