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Japanese Raisin Tree
RaisinTree

Japanese Raisin Tree

$29.99$39.99

Zone: 7-10 Raisin Tree Size Info

Size: 2 Gal., 1-2 Ft. Size: 3 Gal., 3-4 Ft.

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SKU: 1176 Category:

Product Description

Japanese Raisin Tree – Exotic Fruit!

Rare and hard to find! (Hovenia dulcis) or Japanese Raisin tree is a lovely deciduous shade tree that is cultivated in Japan for its fruit. Actually you eat the swollen stalks that the fruit grows on. In June the tree is covered with masses of 2-3 inch fragrant, creamy-white flowers growing in clusters. Bees, butterflies and birds love them. In September, when the thickened stalks fall to the ground, they are ripe and will have a sweet, pear-like flavor. Each stalk is small, but the tree produces bountifully. Fruit dries well (and look like raisins) keeps for months! The tree grows in all but constantly or mostly wet sites, but likes a fertile, sandy loam in full to part sun. Final size is about 30 feet high by 20-25 feet wide. Self fertile. Zones 7-10.

Note: We’re so sorry… but due to agricultural restrictions we cannot ship any plants to international countries, or the states of California, Hawaii and Alaska. Also, no citrus trees can be shipped outside of the state of Florida.

Additional Information

Pot Size

3 Gal, 2 Gal

Plant Height

1-2 Ft., 2-3 Ft.

Planting Zone

7-10

Pollinator

Self-fertile

Raisin Tree Fruit

Japanese Raisin Tree

(Hovenia dulcis) or Japanese Raisin tree is a lovely deciduous shade tree that is cultivated in Japan for its fruit. Actually you eat the swollen stalks that the fruit grows on. In June the tree is covered with masses of 2-3 inch fragrant, creamy-white flowers growing in clusters. Bees, butterflies and birds love them. In September, when the thickened stalks fall to the ground, they are ripe and will have a sweet, pear-like flavor. Each stalk is small, but the tree produces bountifully. Fruit dries well (and look like raisins) keeps for months! The tree grows in all but constantly or mostly wet sites, but likes a fertile, sandy loam in full to part sun. Final size is about 30 feet high by 20-25 feet wide. Self-fertile. Zones 7-10.

 

POLLINATION

Japanese Raisin are self-pollinatingg. They’re a great choice for small yards that need a fast growing shade tree.

Landscaping with Japanese Raisin Trees…..

Raisin Tree

Japanese Raisin Tree, photo by Rebekah D. Wallace, University of Georgia, bugwood.org

Japanese Raisin tree will grow to approximately 20-30 feet tall. The trees have beautiful glossy heart shaped leaves. The fast growing trees are very stately with tall rounded crowns when they grow out. With interesting contrasting bark, they are particularly attractive when planted in groups. Clouds of fragrant white flowers in early summer.

Try a Japanese Raisin tree as focal point in your landscape. Put one where you’ll want summer shade and where you can smell the fragrance as you enter the garden. Add a hedge of rosemary for contrast. Tie it all together with a lush ground cover of strawberries for a never-ending cycle of flowers, fruit and fall color.

 

 

 

 

LEARN WHERE AND HOW TO PLANT YOUR JAPANESE RAISIN TREES (Open Me)

SITE SELECTION AND CORRECT SPACING FOR JAPANESE RAISIN TREES

 

Well-drained sandy soils are preferred, but Japanese Raisin Trees will grow on any soil type as long as good drainage is provided. Trees will fruit in a light shade but prefer full sun. Quite cold hardy Japanese Raisin Trees are good choices for cold sites, like the north side of the house or area prone to frost pockets. They thrive in harsh dry locations where few other fruit trees can make a go of it.

 

GETTING THE SOIL RIGHT AND PLANTING JAPANESE RAISIN TREES

Planting a TreeJujubes prefer slightly acid soil (pH 5.5-6.5), but soils of up to moderate alkalinity are readily tolerated. If you are in doubt about the acidity of your soil, take a soil sample to the Cooperative Extension Agent in your county for a soil test.

Dig a planting hole approximately three times the width of the pot and at the same depth as the root ball. Set that soil aside and mix it 50/50 with either aged mushroom compost, aged manure, or rotted pine bark & aged manure/compost. Remove the plant from the pot, gently loosen the root ball and place in the planting hole. To avoid burying too deep, make sure plant is positioned with the top most roots at the soil line. Fill the planting hole with the mix of soil and organic matter; gently tamp it in. Water thoroughly to settle the roots and eliminate air pockets. Do NOT put fertilizer in the planting hole. Only apply fertilizer if it is the correct time of year (see Fertilization section below).

MULCHING If desired, construct a water basin around the base of the tree approximately 36 inches in diameter. Keep an area approximately 4 feet in diameter around the apple clear of grass and weeds to minimize competition for water and nutrients. Mulch in spring and summer with approximately 4-6 inches of mulch. Pull mulch a couple of inches away from the trunk for good air circulation. In spring, we suggest a mix of compost and weed-free hay as mulch. In summer, use weed-free hay or grass clippings alone. Pine bark and pine needles are also good mulches.

LEARN HOW TO FERTILIZE AND WATER YOUR JAPANESE RAISIN TREES (Open Me)

FERTILIZING JAPANESE RAISIN TREES

The type of fertilizer you choose may be chemical or organic. Make sure that the fertilizer
contains iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium, molybdenum, copper and boron. These minor elements
are very important to plants and most soils are low in these elements. Application rates vary
according to the age of the plant.

See chart below.

FERTILIZING JAPANESE RAISIN TREES
10-10-10 or 10-0-10 with minerals

1 cup per each year of trees life

-Max out at 9 cups on Mature Trees

Espoma Citrus Tone

(Organic)

 

6 cups for 1 year old

10 cups for 2 year old (4-6ft)

18 cups for 7-9ft tree

24 cups for tree over 9ft

Spread the fertilizer evenly under the entire canopy of the plant avoiding a 5-inch area around the trunk. Water or rake in. For Zones 9-10, fertilize 3 times each year in late February,

late May and late July/early August. For plants further north (Zones 7-8b), fertilize in March or after bud break. Never fertilize after August (June in Zones 7-8b) as this will promote new growth late in the year which will be subject to freeze damage.

WATERING JAPANESE RAISIN TREES

The first year is the critical time for the establishment of a new fig. Water thoroughly
twice a week on light soils and once a week on clay soils. Soak the entire root system deeply – this
usually takes 40-50 minutes. Japanese Raisin Trees should receive at least 1 inch of water each week for best growth
and fruit production. Water regularly, especially during dry periods.

LEARN HOW TO PRUNE YOUR JAPANESE RAISIN TREES (Open Me)

PRUNING JAPANESE RAISIN TREES

Japanese Raisin Tree requires little to no pruning, as the tree drop unnecessary branches as it ages.  Remove crossing branched that would cause rubbing injuries. Remove dead and damaged wood when appropriate.

LEARN HOW TO CONTROL INSECTS AND DISEASE ON YOUR JAPANESE RAISIN TREES (Open Me)

Japanese Raisin Trees are essentially free from pests and diseases. They are probably one of the best fruits for organic gardeners.

 

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LEARN HOW TO WINTER PROTECT YOUR JAPANESE RAISIN TREES (Open Me)

Japanese Raisin Trees are essentially free from pests and diseases. They are probably one of the best fruits for organic gardeners.