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Goji Berry 4
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Goji Berry Plant

$16.99$26.99

Zone: 6-9Size: 4x4x9, 1 Ft.Goji Size Info

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Product Description

Note: We’re so sorry… but due to agricultural restrictions we cannot ship any plants to international countries, or the states of California, Hawaii and Alaska. Also, no citrus trees can be shipped outside of the state of Florida.

Goji Berry (Lycium barnarum)- One of the Most Healthful Fruits you Can Eat!

Native to the Himalayan Mountains, Goji berries are known world-wide for being one of the most nutritionally dense foods. These red berries are packed with essential vitamins, minerals, 18 amino acids and antioxidants. While easy to grow, the plants do need a high pH soil (6.8-8) and not a lot of nitrogen. Eat fresh or dehydrate them. Fruit ripens in mid summer until frost. Zone 6-9.

Additional Information

Pot Size

1 Gal, 3 Gal

Plant Height

2-3 Ft., 1 Ft.

Planting Zone

6-9

Pollinator

Self-fertile

Ripening Season

Mid summer to frost.

Choosing the Right Grape Vine Variety…

 Triump Muscadine Grape FruitMUSCADINE GRAPES Most Southerners have picked muscadine grapes growing in the wild as children. Sometimes called Scuppernongs or fox grapes. These spicy-sweet, thick-skinned grapes are an old Southern favorite and can still be found growing wild throughout the lower South. They thrive with little care, and the vines remain productive for 100 years! Modern breeding has brought us a wonderful range of varieties: wine grapes for the home vintner and jelly maker, plus delicious fresh-eating varieties, which can be as large as golf balls! Some muscadine grapes are self pollinating, while the female varieties need a self-pollinating variety to help them set fruit. 

Noble Muscadine GrapeBUNCH GRAPES Finding varieties of bunch grapes that will grow well in the south is somewhat of a new occurrence. From Northern Carolina, south to Florida, and west to Texas, grapes are subject to injury and  loss by Pierce’s Disease. Thanks are largely due to the Universities of Florida, Mississippi and Texas, we can now enjoy several varieties of bunch grapes. Because of these Pierce’s Disease resistant grape varieties, Florida, Georgia, and the Carolina’s now have thriving wine industries. Many of the wines created from these varieties have won awards on the national level and are treasured for their unique flavors.

POLLINATION

Grape Flowers MUSCADINE GRAPE varieties are either self fertile, meaning they will bear without another grape close by or females. The females need to have a self fertile variety within 30 foot to bear a crop. If you want only one grape, choose a self-pollinating variety. Choose at least one self-pollinating grape to pollinate up to four females.  If you are planting several rows of female muscadine grapes, ideally every third grape in a row should be self-fertile to pollinate adjacent female plants. 

BUNCH GRAPES All of the varieties of Pierce’s Disease varieties we offer are self fertile.

Landscaping with Grape Vines…..

Grapes Muscadines VineyardGrapes add a touch of old world charm to any landscape. With large, lush leaves and gnarled, shaggy-barked trunks, grapes are particularly attractive with clusters of fruit hanging down through the foliage. Use them on fences to divide areas or create hidden gardens within your larger landscape picture. Train them over a patio for a living roof that’s cool and shady, but drops its leaves in the winter to let the warm sun in. They can also be trained into small weeping trees for interesting accents in the border or in a large container.

LEARN WHERE AND HOW TO PLANT YOUR GRAPE VINES (Open Me)

SITE SELECTION AND CORRECT SPACING FOR GRAPE VINES

Grapes do well on a wide range of soils, but rich sandy loam or clay loam soils are preferred. Grapes do not tolerate flooding and may grow poorly in mucky soils unless planted in raised mounds. Plants will grow more vigorously and produce more fruit in full sun. Grapes prefer slightly acid soil (pH 6.0-6.5), but soils of up to moderate alkalinity are tolerated. If you are in doubt about the acidity of your soil, take a soil sample to the Cooperative Extension Agent in your county for a soil test.

SPACING GRAPE VINES

 Space grapes 20 ft. apart. 

GETTING THE SOIL RIGHT AND PLANTING GRAPE VINES

Planting GrapesThe grape should be planted in the middle of the main posts of your trellis. Dig a planting hole approximately three times the width of the pot and at the same depth as the root ball. Set that soil aside and mix it 50/50 with either aged mushroom compost, aged manure, or rotted pine bark & aged manure/mushroom compost. Remove the plant from the pot, gently loosen the root ball and place in the planting hole. To avoid burying too deep, make sure plant is positioned with the top most roots at the soil line. Fill the planting hole with the mix of soil and organic matter; gently tamp it in. Water thoroughly to settle the roots and eliminate air pockets. Do NOT put fertilizer in the planting hole. Only apply fertilizer if it is the correct time of year (see Fertilization section below). 

MULCHING GRAPE VINES

 If desired, construct a water basin around the base of the tree approximately 36 inches in diameter. Mulch in spring and summer with approximately 4-6 inches of mulch. Pull mulch a couple of inches away from the trunk for good air circulation.

 

LEARN HOW TO BUILD A TRELLIS and TRAIN YOUR GRAPE VINES (Open Me)

Single Wire Trellis SystemYou do need to train grapes to a trellis to get them to fruit. It’s a little more work to start with, but the result is a long-lived, productive vine. The single wire trellis is the simplest method, and the one most used by commercial growers. Two and three wire horizontal trellises offer great possibility for use as living fences. The tee bar trellis is our personal favorite. It offers the greatest yield for the least amount of labor in pruning and is the easiest to pick. Overhead arbors are beautiful additions to the orchard and offer a wonderful place to sit and rest and enjoy the view. They’re a little more work to set up and prune, but well worth the effort. We’ll explain the single wire and tee bar trellises here, but the same construction principles apply to all trellises. For any trellis, choose sturdy materials designed to last the life of the vine. Posts should be pressure treated lumber at least 4X4 in diameter and 8 ft. long; wire should be at least 9 gauge in diameter. Your goal in training your muscadine vine is to grow the vine in a form that will produce fruit over many years. The basic shape (modified somewhat depending upon the trellis you’ve built) is a single trunk 5-6 ft. high and 2-4 arms each 10 ft. long. For a single wire trellis, you’ll train the vine to a single trunk and 2 arms, each 10 ft. in length with fruiting spurs at 6 in. intervals. For any double wire trellis (including the tee bar), you’ll have 4 arms, each 10 ft. long with fruiting spurs at 6 in. intervals. For an arbor, you’ll figure out how to shape your vine’s arms over the top of the arbor while keeping the 2 or 4 arm structure.

Single Wire Trellis SystemSingle Wire Trellis: Set 8 ft. main posts 20 ft. apart, sinking posts 3 ft. deep. Sink dead man support posts 3 ft. deep approximately 7-8 ft. from each end post in your row of grapes, angled away from the last main post. Attach trellis wire from the end dead man post, across the top of the main posts and to the end dead man post using heavy duty wire staples. Install turnbuckles between the end posts and the dead man posts so the trellis wire can be tightened as needed over time.

Year 1: Your goal is to train the vine to the trellis, developing a single trunk. Choose the strongest shoot on the vine and remove any extra shoots. Use a stake or a string tied to the trellis to wind the shoot around so it will grow to contact the trellis in the middle of the 2 main posts. Pinch the shoot tip off when the vine reaches the trellis level.

Training Grapes Years 1 and 2Year 2: Your vine should have reached the level of the trellis and you should have pinched out the tip. Several shoots will form at the tip. Choose the strongest 2 shoots and train them along the trellis wires in opposite directions. You’re done when the arms reach 10 ft. long and the vine looks like an elongated “T”. Do not allow the arms to wind around the wires. Shoots will grow from the young arms and all should be allowed to grow to produce the first fruiting spurs. Remove all extra shoots from the trunk as needed. 

LEARN HOW TO FERTILIZE AND WATER YOUR GRAPE VINES (Open Me)

FERTILIZING GRAPE VINES

The type of fertilizer you choose may be chemical or organic. Make sure that the fertilizer contains iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium, molybdenum, copper and boron. These minor elements are very important to plants and most soils are low in these elements. Application rates vary according to age of plant. See chart below. The amount of fertilizer applied increases each year until the 5th year after planting. 

See chart below.

FERTILIZING GRAPE VINES
10-10-10 or 10-0-10 with minerals

YEAR 1

Sprinkle 1 cup (½ lb) in a 2ft circle around each plant in late February, late May and late July

YEAR 2

Sprinkle 2 cups (1 lb) in a 4ft circle around each plant in late February, late May and late July

YEAR 3

Sprinkle 4 cups (2 lbs) in a 6ft circle around each plant in late February and late July.

YEAR 4

Sprinkle 6 cups (3lbs) in a 6ft circle around each plant in late February and late July.

YEAR 5

Sprinkle 8 cups (4 lbs) in a 6ft circle around each plant in late February and late July.

Espoma Citrus Tone

(Organic)

 

YEAR 1

Sprinkle 2 cups of Citrus Tone in a 2ft circle around each plant in late February, late May and late July.

YEAR 2

Sprinkle 4 cups of Citrus Tone in a 4ft circle around each plant in late February, late May and late July.

YEAR 3

Sprinkle 8 cups of Citrus Tone around each plant in a 6 ft circle in late February and late July.

YEAR 4

Sprinkle 10 cups of Citrus Tone in a 6ft circle around each plant in late February and late July

YEAR 5

Sprinkle 14 cups of Citrus Tone in a 6ft circle around each plant in late February and late July

To maintain established grape vines (6th year and older), spread 10 cups (5 lbs)

10-10-10 (10-0-10) or 20 cups Citrus Tone per vine in a 6ft area in late February and late May. Spread the fertilizer evenly avoiding a 5-inch area around the trunk. Water or rake in. For Zones 8a-10, fertilize 3 times each year in late February, late May and late July/early August. For plants further north (Zone 7), fertilize in March or after bud break. Never fertilize after August (June in Zone 7) as this will promote new growth late in the year which will be subject to freeze damage.

Grapes need more magnesium than many other fruit. Magnesium deficiency shows as a progressive yellowing between the veins of older leaves and may cause premature fruit fall. To prevent or correct magnesium deficiency, Epsom salts can be applied at the rate of 2-4 ounces for 1-2 year old vines and 4-6 ounces for older vines (recommended application rates from the Georgia Cooperative Extension Service). Spread the Epsom salts over a 6 foot circle around each plant. 

WATERING GRAPE VINES

The first year is a critical time for the establishment of a new grape. Water thoroughly twice a week on light soils and once a week on clay soils. Soak the entire root system deeply – this usually takes 45-60 minutes. Grapes should receive at least 1 inch of water each week for best growth and fruit production. Water regularly, especially during dry periods. Fruit may drop prematurely if insufficiently irrigated during dry spells.

LEARN HOW TO PRUNE YOUR GRAPE VINES (Open Me)

PRUNING GRAPE VINES

Muscadine Grape After Pruning 1Fruit is produced on new shoots developing from the previous year’s growth. In Year 3, canes produced the previous year should be pruned to approximately 3 in. long in January or February. These canes will produce several shoots that will fruit during the following summer. These new shoots will be cut back to 3 in. the next winter, forming the first fruiting spurs.

Depending upon the growth rate of the plants, spurs will need to be thinned in Year 5 or 6 after planting. During the winter pruning, remove every other shoot, aiming for a fruiting spur every 6 in. on each arm. Choose spurs on the top of the vine, if possible. Allow a few extra shoots to grow from the arms to form replacement spurs as the vine ages. Remove tendrils twining around the arms or spurs to prevent girdling. 

LEARN HOW TO CONTROL INSECTS AND DISEASE ON YOUR GRAPE VINES (Open Me)

Triump Muscadine Grape FruitDisease and insects on muscadines grapes are rare. When fruit is close to ripening you may have fruit rots occur. If so spray vine with Bordeaux or Neem . Occasionally you may be bothered by Flea Beetles or Aphids on the vines. Use Neem or Pyrethrin, if damage is present.

Bunch grapes can be more susteable to fruit rots and other fungus issue. Avoid over head water to keep the leaves dry. Neem and Bordeaux  spray will control most of the common problems. For a complete run down of insects that can attack grapes in the south see the publication Insect Pests of Grapes in Florida. For people that want to learn more about how to grow grapes organically here is a good publication from Cornell University Production Guide for Organic Grapes.

Always remember that good disease resistance begins with the health of the plant. Plants stressed from lack of water, not enough sun or being under fed are more susceptible to disease and insects.  Maintaining good sanitation practices in the vineyard is most important. The removal of diseased and dead wood, and picking up fallen or rotting fruit off the vines as it occurs, will go a long way in keeping disease and insects at a minimum. Spray at first sign of an issue, rather than waiting until the problem is out of hand will go a long way to keeping your plants healthy and fruiting properly.

 

Choosing the Right Berry Variety…

Natchez BlackberrySummer and berries—searching the roadside for patches of tasty wild berries for jams and fresh eating. Every country family has done it, and the wild patches are quickly disappearing to urban sprawl. So why not grow your own? Homegrown blackberries are well worth the effort, and can be grown by any gardener. Smaller growers than fruit trees, they fit easily into the tightest of yards, and can be easily tucked into your landscape or just added to the vegetable garden.  Many new cultivars make it easy to have that same wild flavor in a patch in your backyard (and some varieties are thorn-less). Most of the varieties you’ll buy from us, are bred for their size, production, and excellent fresh flavor. We choose to offer plants that do especially well in the hot humid south. In the edible landscape they make great hedges and as backdrops for the flower border. Even a city gardener can have a few berry plants by planting them in pots!

POLLINATION

Blackberries, boysenberries, and raspberries (Yes, we have a raspberry for the South) are all self-pollinating, so plant one or plant 100!

 

LANDSCAPING WITH BERRY PLANTS Open Me)

Landscaping with Berry Plants…..

Elderberry FlowersBrambles can be upright hedge varieties or trailing varieties that require a trellis. Use a row of hedging blackberries to define your garden’s edge. Add a boysenberry or raspberry trellis beside a path and have a berry on the way down the driveway. The hedging growth of elderberry bushes can add a graceful screen to your property or when planted as a single specimen develops into a graceful 10 foot shrub with arching canes, beautiful in flower as well as when fruiting. Regardless of which berry you choose, don’t forget to plant a few extra plants for all the wildlife they’ll attract!

LEARN WHERE AND HOW TO PLANT YOUR BERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

SITE SELECTION AND CORRECT SPACING FOR BERRY PLANTS

Well-drained, sandy, rich soils are preferred. Raspberries, Boysenberries and Blackberries do not tolerate flooding and may grow poorly in mucky soils unless planted in raised mounds. Elderberries on the other hand love wetlands. All berry plants will grow more vigorously and produce more fruit in full sun.

SPACING For trailing varieties that need a trellis set your plants 10 feet apart in rows at least 15 foot apart. It is best to place your plants 5 feet from pressure treated posts. For hedge row plantings of Elderberry, plant at least 5 feet apart so they will have room to spread and plant rows at least 15 foot apart. For specimen plants set plants 1o to 15 foot apart. Upright blackberries and raspberries are planted 2 to 3 feet apart in the row with 15 feet between rows

GETTING THE SOIL RIGHT AND PLANTING BERRY PLANTS

Berry Planting

 

  Brambles prefer slightly acid soil (pH 6.0-6.5), but soils of moderate alkalinity are tolerated. Elderberries aren’t picky about soil types and will thrive in acid or alkaline soils. If you are in doubt about the acidity of your soil, take a soil sample to the Cooperative Extension Agent in your county for a soil test.Enrich the bed with 1 to 3 inches of aged manure or mushroom compost. Before planting make sure the plants are well watered and the soil in your planting hole is not excessively dry. Remove the plant from the pot and place in the planting hole. To avoid burying too deep, make sure plant is positioned with the top most roots at the soil line. If plants have a tightly packed root system gently work the root ball loose. Water thoroughly to settle the roots and eliminate air pockets. Do NOT put fertilize in the planting hole. Only apply fertilizer if it is the correct time of year (see Fertilization section below).

MULCHING Beds may be mulched with organic mulches like hay, oat straw, bark and leaves. Mulching is beneficial in controlling competitive weeds as well as building the organic matter in the root zone. A well mulched bed will encourage good root sucker formation and a healthy full row of canes sooner.

 

LEARN HOW TO BUILD A TRELLIS FOR YOUR BERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

Berry TellisTRELLISES FOR TRAILING BLACKBERRY AND BOYSENBERRY To construct a simple 3 Wire Horizontal trellis for trailing blackberry and boysenberry use two 7-8 feet upright posts sunk 2 feet in the ground leaving 5-6 feet above ground. Anchor end posts. Attach three 9-gauge wires at 18-inch intervals beginning 24 inches from the ground. Place posts no more than 20 feet apart for best stability (diagram has posts at 10 ft.).

 

Raspberry TrellisRASPBERRY TRELLISES, you’ll need to build a T bar catch rail system. Set a row of post 10 feet apart in the middle of the hedge row.  Post should be 4″x4″x8 foot in length and set two foot in the ground, bringing the top to an overall height of 5 foot. Attach one 2″x4″x18″  at 24″ off grade. Attach the second 2″x4″x24″  at the top of the post. String 2 sets of wire (9 gauge) on top of ends of tee bars to form the catch rail system.Use an achorage system on the end posts. See diagram..

LEARN HOW TO FERTILIZE AND WATER YOUR BERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

FERTILIZING BERRY PLANTS

The type of fertilizer you choose may be chemical or organic. Make sure that the fertilizer contains iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium, molybdenum, copper and boron. These minor elements are very important to plants and most soils are low in these elements. Application rates vary according to age of plant.

HEDGE ROW PLANTINGS of Blackberry, Boysenberry, Elderberry and Raspberry plants the amount of fertilizer applied increases each year until the 4th year after planting. In hedge row plantings by the 3rd year the plants should have grown together, so apply your fertilizer for every four foot of row, spreading the fertilizer in a four foot wide band down the row.

 For Zones 9-10, fertilize 3 times each year in late February, late May and late July/early August. For plants further north (Zones 7-8b), fertilize in March or after bud break. Never fertilize after August (June in Zones 7-8b) as this will promote new growth late in the year which will be subject to freeze damage.Water or rake in fertilizer. 

See chart below.

FERTILIZING HEDGE ROW PLANTS
10-10-10 or 10-0-10 with minerals

YEAR 1

Sprinkle 2/3 cup in a 24-inch circle around each plant in late February.

In late May and late July, sprinkle 2/3 cup in a 30-inch circle around each plant.

 

YEAR 2

Sprinkle 1 cup in a 36-inch circle around each plant in late February, late May and late July

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 3

Sprinkle 2 cups of fertilizer in a 4 ft circle around each plant in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

YEAR 4 AND SO ON

Sprinkle 3 cups for every 4ft of row. Spread fertilizer in a 4ft wide band down the row.

 

 

 

 

Espoma Citrus Tone

(Organic)

 

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 1

Sprinkle 1 ½ cups of Citrus Tone in a 24-inch circle around each plant in late February.

In late May and late July, sprinkle

1 ½ cups of Citrus Tone in a 30-inch circle around each plant.

YEAR 2

Sprinkle 2 ½ cups of Citrus Tone in a 36-inch circle around each plant in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 3

Sprinkle 4 cups of Citrus Tone around each plant in a 4 ft circle in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 4 AND SO ON

Sprinkle 6 cups for every 4ft of row. Spread fertilizer in a 4ft wide band down the row.

 

 

 

 

 

SPECIMEN ELDERBERRIES use 1 cup of 10-10-10 or 10-0-10 for each year of a elderberry’s age in late February, late May and late July/early August (i.e. 1 cup per application for a one year-old elderberry, 2 cups for a two year-old). Continue increasing fertilizer yearly until application rate reaches 4 cups. If using Citrus Tone, use 2 cups for each year of elderberry’s age. Increase each year, until you reach 8 cups.

 

Spread the fertilizer evenly under the entire canopy of the plant avoiding a 5-inch area around the trunk. Water or rake in. For Zones 9-10, fertilize 3 times each year in late February, late May and late July/early August. For plants further north (Zones 7-8b), fertilize in March or after bud break. Never fertilize after August (June in Zones 7-8b) as this will promote new growth late in the year which will be subject to freeze damage.

WATERING BERRY PLANTS

The first year is the critical time for the establishment of a new fig. Water thoroughly
twice a week on light soils and once a week on clay soils. Soak the entire root system deeply – this
usually takes 40-50 minutes. Berry plants should receive at least 1 inch of water each week for best growth
and fruit production. Water regularly, especially during dry periods. Fruit may drop
prematurely if insufficiently irrigated during dry spells.

LEARN HOW TO TRAIN AND PRUNE YOUR BERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

TRAINING AND PRUNING BERRY PLANTS

TRELLISED VARIETIES: Fruit is produced on 2 year-old canes, which die after fruiting. New canes that sprout in the spring will fruit the following year. In the first year after planting, the canes you planted will fruit. Thread the original canes you planted through the wires for the fruiting season. Allow the current year’s new canes to run along the ground. After fruiting, cut and remove the canes that have fruited. Thread the new canes through the trellis. Spread canes evenly through the trellis and thread carefully to avoid breakage and support the canes.

ERECT BLACKBERRY AND RASPBERRY: Fruit is produced on 2 year-old canes, which die after fruiting. New canes that sprout in the spring will fruit the following year. In the first year after planting, the canes you planted will fruit and should be removed after they die. The new canes produced from the original canes you planted in spring, should be topped to about 40 inches in early summer to encourage lateral branching, and then allowed to grow until the winter dormant season. In each succeeding year, remove the current year’s fruiting canes after they produce fruit.

ELDERBERRY: Fruits each year and like blueberries extend themselves through suckers that come up from the roots. In time elderberries can become a thick hedge and will require clearing out of old and dead branches/stems. 

LEARN HOW TO CONTROL INSECTS AND DISEASE ON YOUR BERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

Insects and disease on cane berries are rarely a problem. Buying disease free plants is the sure way to avoid trouble. After harvest, trim dying canes that bore fruit, gather and burn or haul off thetrimmings to stop any future problems. Most berry patches have a life span of about 7 years, at this point it is best to start a new row else where. Gather your healthiest suckers from you existing patch or buy disease free stock and rebuild a new row with manure and good mulch to plant them in. It’s this rotation of planting area that will help you avoid the worse of the berry diseases. 

Always remember that good disease resistance begins with the health of the plant. Plants stressed from lack of water, not enough sun or being under fed are more susceptible to disease and insects.  Maintaining good sanitation practices in the orchard is most important. The removal of diseased and dead wood, and picking up fallen or rotting fruit off the trees as it occurs, will go a long way in keeping disease and insects at a minimum. Spray at first sign of an issue, rather than waiting until the problem is out of hand will go a long way to keeping your plants healthy and fruiting properly.

 

Choosing the Right Blueberry Variety…

Ochlockonee Blueberry Fruit Native throughout most of the eastern United States, blueberries are one of the easiest and most rewarding fruits the homeowner can grow. The bushes require a little effort to establish, but once rooted are very disease and drought resistant; most fruit their second year. Thanks to recent breeding programs at the Universities of Florida and Georgia, we now have a wide range of varieties to choose from, making it possible to have delicious blueberries from early May to late July! We attend many blueberry seminars throughout the year so we are always up on the latest and most practical techniques to help you with site evaluation, soil preparation, correct planting procedures and maintenance of your blueberry patch.

POLLINATION

Blueberries require cross pollination. Thus we always have to plant at least two varieties to ensure good fruit set. Two groups of blueberries are available.

 

-Rabbiteye blueberries were developed from native rabbiteye blueberries. They grow as shrubs and will reach 6-20 feet. Their ripening season is from May to July.

 

Blueberry Flowers-Tetraploid (Southern Highbush) blueberries are a new development – a cross between Rabbiteye and Northern Highbush blueberries. Everything is different about them. They are smaller, slower-growing and have thicker, more crinkly leaves. Most important, they extend the blueberry season by ripening heavy crops at the very start of the blueberry season. Tetraploids require some extra fruit thinning to achieve a balance between plant size and healthy fruit production. Each group requires a pollinator from within the group—you must plant at least two varieties of rabbiteye or two varieties of tetraploid. A brief list of varieties is at the end of this handout.

 

LANDSCAPING WITH BLUEBERRY PLANTS Open Me)

Landscaping with Blueberry Plants…..

Blueberry FlowersAnywhere you want a hedge, think of blueberries first. These durable, low-maintenance shrubs have a unique misty blue cast and are truly beautiful in all seasons. In spring, dainty, bell-like white blooms cover reddish canes. Flowers are followed by blue-tinged foliage and huge clusters of powder blue fruit. In autumn they make a brilliant show as they turn from orange to scarlet to fiery red.

Sunshine Blueberry FruitIf you want a short thick hedge, tetraploids grow more slowly and can be sheared. Most of the tetraploids will mature to around 6 to 8 foot in height. If you want a very low 3 to 4 foot hedge plant Sunshine Blue. Rabbiteye varieties make a nice tall thick hedge anywhere from 6-20 feet high. Use blueberries to line a driveway or walkway or as backdrop hedges. In the garden, line a fence with blueberries for luscious fruit that doesn’t take much space and is always lovely. Choose varieties with different ripening times to spread the fruiting season. Blueberries can also be trained into fountain-shaped shrubs or small trees. Some varieties do well as container plants for a patio gardener.

 

LEARN WHERE AND HOW TO PLANT YOUR BLUEBERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

SITE SELECTION AND CORRECT SPACING FOR BLUEBERRY PLANTS

Well-drained sandy loam soils are preferred, but blueberries will grow on many soil types if good drainage is provided. Blueberries will grow more vigorously and produce more fruit in full sun. Avoid frost pockets – late season frosts can damage fruit production in early-flowering varieties.

SPACING

 Spacing for blueberries depends upon the desired use in the landscape. Bushes can be planted individually or in a hedgerow. If planting a hedgerow, space 5-6 feet apart with rows 10-12 feet apart. If planting bushes individually, place plants for cross pollination no more than 10 feet apart. Remove all flowers the first year to encourage more growth.

 

GETTING THE SOIL RIGHT AND PLANTING BLUEBERRY PLANTS

Berry PlantingBlueberries require acid soil (pH 4.5-5.5). If you are in doubt about the acidity of your soil, take a soil sample to the Cooperative Extension Agent in your county for a soil test. Blueberries will not grow well in soils with a pH above 5.5. Adjust soil acidity as necessary with powdered sulfur and iron sulfate. Do NOT use aluminum sulfate, as this material is toxic to blueberries. For individual plants, sulfur a 6 x 6 foot area around the plant. Hedgerows need to be sulfured in a 3 foot wide band down the row.

Blueberries are spreaders by nature, they send out root suckers and will over time in a hedge row setting grow together. This is good for the plant as new sucker formation keeps the plants healthy. In order to encourage the spread of the plant roto-till  acidic organic matter like ground rotted pine bark or oak leaves into the a 3-4 foot wide band down the row. When planting dig a hole approximately three times the width of the pot and at the same depth as the root ball. Enrich the planting hole with peat moss mixed with soil dug from the hole (50/50 mix). Do NOT use mushroom compost or manure in the planting hole or as mulch. You can make your plants sick and even kill them with manure or mushroom compost.

Remove the blueberry bush from the pot, gently loosen the root ball and place in the planting hole. To avoid burying too deep, make sure the plant is positioned with the top most roots at the soil line. Fill the planting hole with the mix of soil and peat moss; gently tamp it in. Water thoroughly to settle the roots and eliminate air pockets. Do NOT put fertilize in the planting hole. Only apply fertilizer if it is the correct time of year (see Fertilization section below).

 

MULCHING

Blueberry Mulch Beds IFASIf desired, construct a water basin around the base of the bush approximately 36 inches in diameter. Blueberries are very shallowly rooted and a good mulch insures the plants root stay moist in dry spells. It also cuts down on weed competition. Mulch in spring and fall with approximately 4-6 inches of acid mulch (pine bark, oak leaves).If trying to create a hedge row planting,mulch a 3-4 foot wide area down the row.  Pull mulch a couple of inches away from the trunk for good air circulation. Do NOT mulch with mushroom compost.

LEARN HOW TO FERTILIZE AND WATER YOUR BLUEBERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

FERTILIZING BLUEBERRY PLANTS

The type of fertilizer you choose may be chemical or organic. Make sure that the fertilizer
contains iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium, molybdenum, copper and boron. These minor elements
are very important to plants and most soils are low in these elements. Application rates vary
according to age of plant.

See chart below.

FERTILIZING HEDGE ROW PLANTS
10-8-8

(with minerals)

for Azalea/Camellias

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 1

1/2 cup per plant in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 2

1 cup per plant in late February, late May and late July.

YEAR 3

2 cups per plant in late February, late May and late July.

.

 

 

 

 

YEAR 4 AND SO ON

4 cups for every 4ft of row. Spread fertilizer in a 4ft wide band down the row in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Espoma

Holly Tone

(Organic)

 

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 1

1 ½ cup per plant in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 2

2 ½ cups per plant in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 3

4 cups per plant in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR 4 AND SO ON

6-10 cups for every 4ft of row. Spread fertilizer in a 4ft wide band down the row in late February, late May and late July.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be careful to spread the fertilizer evenly over the blueberry’s root zone and water it in well. Blueberries form suckers and the plant expands each year, the amount of fertilizer applied increases each year until the 4th year after planting.

In Zones 8-9 fertilize 3 times each year in late February, late May and late July/early August. Never fertilize after August as this will promote new growth late in the year which will be subject to freeze damage.

If your young blueberry plants aren’t growing, they may be stalled. In that event, supplement your fertilizer with a liquid fertilizer for Azalea/Camellias (like Miracid). Treat them once a week for a month. If they still haven’t grown 6 inches, continue the treatment. Blueberries need to double in size the first year in the ground or they will be stunted.

WATERING BLUEBERRY PLANTS

The first year is a critical time for the establishment of a new blueberry bush. Water thoroughly twice a week on light soils and once a week on clay soils. Soak the entire root system deeply – this usually takes 45-60 minutes. Established bushes should receive at least 1 inch of water each week. Because blueberries are very shallowly rooted, we strongly recommend that irrigation be installed when you plant your blueberries. Microsprinkler irrigation works best, because water is spread over the root zone. Soaker hoses can be used in a pinch. Water regularly, especially during dry periods. Keep an area approximately 4 feet in diameter around the bush clear of grass and weeds to minimize competition for water and nutrients. Mulch this area with pine bark or leaves.

LEARN HOW TO PRUNE YOUR BLUEBERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

PRUNING BLUEBERRY PLANTS

Routine pruning of blueberries is unnecessary until plants are 3 years old. During this time, remove dead, damaged or diseased limbs. Cut any leggy growth so the plant will bush up. Make all cuts flush with the limb or the next largest branch. Do not leave stubs. For established rabbiteye blueberries, approximately one quarter of the oldest canes are pruned each year to encourage cane renewal. Three to four year-old canes have maximum fruit production, declining with age. Blueberries can be lightly topped right after fruit harvest to hold down the height of the plant. All heavy thinning cuts should be made in the dormant season.

 

LEARN HOW TO CONTROL INSECTS AND DISEASE ON YOUR BLUEBERRY PLANTS (Open Me)

Blueberries have few disease or insect problems. Occasionally caterpillars can be a problem and may be controlled with products containing Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis).

Always remember that good disease resistance begins with the health of the plant. Plants stressed from lack of water, not enough sun or being under fed are more susceptible to disease and insects.  Maintaining good sanitation practices in the berry patch is most important. The removal of diseased and dead wood, and picking up fallen or rotting fruit off the bushes as it occurs, will go a long way in keeping disease and insects at a minimum. Spray at first sign of an issue, rather than waiting until the problem is out of hand will go a long way to keeping your plants healthy and fruiting properly.