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Baldwin Pear
Pear Carnes BloomPear Baldwin Tree

BALDWIN PEAR

$34.99

Planting and Care Facts (pdf)Zone: 8A-9ASize: 3 Gal., 4-5 Ft. Pear Size Info

23 in stock

SKU: 1235 Categories: ,

Product Description

Baldwin Soft Pear – Long Ripening!

Baldwin is a long ripening, dual purpose variety. Its large yellow fruit has a slight red blush, and makes both a fine eating and excellent cooking pear. Fruit ripens in August and September. Pollinate with CARNES, FLORDAHOME, HOOD, PINEAPPLE or SUG. Zones 8A-9A.  

Note: We’re so sorry… but due to agricultural restrictions we cannot ship any plants to international countries, or the states of California, Hawaii and Alaska. Also, no citrus trees can be shipped outside of the state of Florida.

Additional Information

Pot Size

3 Gal

Plant Height

3-5 Ft.

Planting Zone

8A-9A

Pollinator

CARNES, FLORDAHOME, HOOD, PINEAPPLE or SUG.

Ripening Season

August through September

Choosing the Right Pear Variety…

Choose Fireblight Resistant Trees
Fireblight is the limiting factor for Pears in the South. Once fireblight attacks a non-resistant variety, it quickly spreads throughout the tree, blackening and killing to the roots. Fortunately there is a variety of pear that is fireblight resistant. These are the Chinese sand pears (Pyrus pyrifolia). Chinese Sand pears differ from European pears, like Bartlett and Seckel, in that they remain firm and crispy after you pick them. Some people dislike this, so much effort has been put into breeding varieties that are soft. By breeding the Chinese Sand pears with the European pear, many varieties of super soft, blight-resistant pears are now available.

This class of pear is long lived, tough and easy to grow. It is often the lone surviving tree when most home orchards are abandoned. We are avid fruit tree collectors and have the honor of maintaining and offering many of these old survivors. Check out some our reintroduction like Golden Boy, Southern Bartlett and Biscamp.

POLLINATION

Most pear require cross pollination to set a crop. It is import to choose a varieties that are in bloom at the same time. See chart below for good matches.

EARLY BLOOMING VARIETIES

PLANT THESE TOGETHER

– HOOD SOFT PEAR

-BALDWIN SOFT PEAR

– FLORDAHOME SOFT PEAR

– SUG SOFT PEAR

-CARNES HARD PEAR

 

 

 

LATE BLOOMING VARIETIES

PLANT THESE TOGETHER

– GOLDEN BOY SOFT PEAR

– COURTHOUSE SOFT PEAR

-LE CONTE SOFT PEAR

-SOUTHERN BARTLETT SOFT PEAR

-TENNS SOFT PEAR

-KEIFFER HARD PEAR

-ORIENT HARD PEAR

EARLY BLOOMING ASIAN PEAR VARIETIES

PLANT THESE TOGETHER 

-Ya Li Asian Pear

-Tsu Li Asian Pear

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LATE BLOOMING ASIAN PEAR

PLANT THESE TOGETHER

-Shinko Asian Pear

-Housi Asian Pear

-Shinshiki Asain Pear

-20th Century Asian Pear

-Korean Giant Asian Pear

 

 

 

Landscaping with Pear Trees…..

LANDSCAPING WITH FIG TREES Open Me)

Landscaping with Pear Trees…..

When young, pears are tall green columns. As they mature, the weight of the fruit pulls the branches down, making the tree look like a cascading fountain of fruit. Pears have shiny deep green leaves offering summer shade and are covered with white blossoms in the spring. Mix tall pears with smaller fruits such as blueberries, blackberries, figs and pomegranates. We like them sprinkled through a wilderness area like dogwoods and crabapples. Pears and driveways, driveways of pears.

WHERE AND HOW TO PLANT YOUR PEAR TREES (Open Me)

SITE SELECTION AND CORRECT SPACING FOR PEAR TREES

Well-drained sandy loam soils are preferred, but pears will grow on many soil types if good drainage is provided. Pears will grow more vigorously and produce more fruit in full sun. Avoid frost pockets – pears may be damaged by unseasonable frosts.

Spacing for pears depends upon the desired use in the landscape. Trees should be at least 15 feet apart. Place pears requiring cross-pollination no further than 20 feet apart.

GETTING THE SOIL RIGHT AND PLANTING PEAR TREES

Pears prefer slightly acid soil (pH 5.9-6.5). If you are in doubt about the acidity of your soil, take soil a sample to the Cooperative Extension Agent in your county for a soil test.

Dig a planting hole approximately three times the width of the pot and at the same depth as the root ball. Set that soil aside and mix it 50/50 with either aged mushroom compost, aged manure, or rotted pine bark & aged manure/compost. Remove the plant from the pot, gently loosen the root ball and place in the planting hole. To avoid burying too deep, make sure plant is positioned with the top most roots at the soil line. Fill the planting hole with the mix of soil and organic matter; gently tamp it in. Water thoroughly to settle the roots and eliminate air pockets. Do NOT put fertilizer in the planting hole. Only apply fertilizer if it is the correct time of year (see Fertilization section below).

MULCHING If desired, construct a water basin around the base of the tree approximately 36 inches in diameter. Mulch in spring and summer with approximately 4-6 inches of mulch. Pull mulch a couple of inches away from the trunk for good air circulation. In spring, we suggest a mix of compost and weed-free hay, while in summer use weed-free hay or grass clippings alone

FERTILIZING PEAR TREES

The type of fertilizer you choose may be chemical or organic. Make sure that the fertilizer
contains iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium, molybdenum, copper and boron. These minor elements
are very important to plants and most soils are low in these elements. Application rates vary
according to age of plant.

See chart below.

1 cup per each year of trees life

-Max out at 9 cups on Mature Trees

 

6 cups for 1 year old

10 cups for 2 year old (4-6ft)

18 cups for 7-9ft tree

24 cups for tree over 9ft

FERTILIZING PEAR TREES
10-10-10 or 10-0-10 with minerals
Espoma Citrus Tone

(Organic)

 

Spread the fertilizer evenly under the entire canopy of the plant avoiding a 5-inch area around the trunk. Water or rake in. For Zones 9-10, fertilize 3 times each year in late February,

late May and late July/early August. For plants further north (Zones 7-8b), fertilize in March or
after bud break. Never fertilize after August (June in Zones 7-8b) as this will promote new growth
late in the year which will be subject to freeze damage.

WATERING PEAR TREES

The first year is the critical time for the establishment of a new pear. Water thoroughly
twice a week on light soils and once a week on clay soils. Soak the entire root system deeply – this
usually takes 40-50 minutes. Figs should receive at least 1 inch of water each week for best growth
and fruit production. Water regularly, especially during dry periods. Fruit may drop
prematurely if insufficiently irrigated during dry spells.

HOW TO PRUNE YOUR PEAR TREE (Open Me)

PRUNING PEAR VINES

The pear’s natural tendency is to grow upright, creating narrow crotches that tend to break under heavy fruit loads. To avoid this, early training is a must. Pegging the tree will insure a form that will bear heavy fruit loads. At planting select 3-4 scaffold branches spaced equally around the trunk and remove other branches flush with the trunk. These scaffold limbs should be pegged down to insure a form that will bear heavy fruit loads. You want the tree to have good air circulation in the interior.

Continue to train pear trees during the first 5 years. Pruning should be designed to train the tree upward and outward by thinning crossing branches and branches that grow in toward the center. The trees can be held in their allotted space by mold and hold cuts, which are devigorating heading cuts made into two year old wood. Do this by topping back the main scaffold limb to a weaker outward growing shoot.

Mature trees are pruned during the dormant season. Thin out branches and head back long shoots as needed to maintain trees height. Remove water sprouts. An unpruned tree will tend to be bushy, lack vigor and to produce small, inferior quality pears. Remove any dead, damaged or diseased branches when pruning. Head trees back with mold and hold cuts to maintain height for ease of picking.

HOW TO THIN YOUR PEAR TREE CROP LOAD TO KEEP YOUR TREE HEALTHY (Open Me)

THINNING FRUIT ON PEAR TREES

It is important not to let your newly planted pears tree bear much fruit until they has become established. Early bearing can stunt and set the tree back from developing good size and structure. It can also weaken the tree, setting it up for insect or disease issues. It is best to pull all of the fruit off the tree the first year and thin the fruit for years 2 and 3 to help the tree be come well established.

Throughout the life of your pear tree it is advisable to thin your crop load, thinning fruit will result is larger more high quality fruit. Thin the fruit when they are the size of walnuts, pull off all but 1 or 2 fruits per cluster. The best rule of thumb is to have 1 fruit per 6 inches of branch.

Pear trees are prone to alternate bearing as they age. This in a syndrome that results from allowing the trees to carry too heavy of a fruit load. The weaken tree responses by bearing a very light crop the following year .  Your trees will live longer and remain healthy if you learn how to thin their fruit loads.

Always remember that good disease resistance begins with the health of the plant. Plants stressed from lack of water, not enough sun or being under fed are more susceptible to disease and insects.  Maintaining good sanitation practices in the orchard is most important. The removal of diseased and dead wood, and picking up fallen or rotting fruit off the trees as it occurs, will go a long way in keeping disease and insects at a minimum. Spray at first sign of an issue, rather than waiting until the problem is out of hand will go a long way to keeping your plants healthy and fruiting properly.